AMERICAN WAYS THIRD EDITION PDF

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Maryanne Kearny elegtrafatswal.ga loAnn Crandall Edward N. Kearny. Dedicated to Lisa Kearny and Joseph Keyerleber American Ways: An Introduction to American Culture, Third Edition. Amercan ways: an introduction to American culture I by Maryanne Kearny Datesman, JoAnn Crandall. American Ways, Third Edition book. Read reviews from world's largest community for readers. Whether you're a businessperson beginning to work in the Unit. american ways third edition | Download eBook pdf, epub The third edition also includes other exercises that can be used to help students become more.


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Perhaps by the time a third edition of this book is writ- ten, clear and graceful Readers of this second edition of American Ways will find elaboration on these. American Ways Third Edition A Cultural Guide To The United States Of America [ PDF] [EPUB] The. New American Bible, Revised Edition. American Culture, 3rd Edition" Pearson ESL | | ISBN: | pages | File type: PDF |. 52 mb American Ways: An Introduction to American.

For all of these reasons, American Ways is suitable for a wide audience. It has been used as a text in a number of programs for foreign students, including intensive English programs, short summer courses in the United States for foreign high school and college students, both quarter and semester courses at American universities, government programs for foreign visitors, and classes for immigrants.

It has also been used in many different settings outside the United States, both as a text for students and as a reference guide-s-for U.

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Peace Corps volunteers, for example, and. What do we really learn when we study other cultures? First and foremost, we learn about our own. Until we are confronted by a different way of doing things, we assume that everyone does things the same way that we do, and thus our own culture-our values, attitudes, behavior-is largely hidden from our view.

When we spend time analyzing another culture, however, we begin to see our own more clearly and to understand some of the subtleties that motivate our behavior and our opinions. To enhance rhis understanding, each chapter in the iv American Ways book is followed by a series of exercises. Some of these exercises are specifically designed to encourage students to think about their own values or patterns of behavior and to compare them with what they are learning about or experiencing in American settings.

We have also included a number of exercises to encourage students to interact with and talk with Americans, In these exercises we have provided a set of carefully structured questions that students can ask Americans. The answers they receive will help students form a composite picture of American beliefs and practices as they relate to education, business, government, sports, recreation, and so on.

Some of the chapter exercises provide students with an opportunity to explore more fully an idea chat has been presented or to discuss ideas with other students.

You may wish to assign different exercises to different students or to small groups of students and then ask them to share their fmdings and opinions with the class. If possible, small groups should include students from different countries so that in addition to learning about American culrure and their own, they are also learning about other cultures.

Perhaps this is the real goal of a course about culture: to help us become more sensitive to cultural dlfferences, and more accepting of them. However, there will always be aspects of another culture that we may not like, no matter how much we understand it. The objective of this book is not to persuade others to approve of life in the United States, but rather to help them understand it more fully..

About the Third Edition In revising the content of this book, we concentrated on updating events that have occurred since the second edition was published in The issues surrounding multiculturalism continue to be of great importance as the cultural diversity of the United States continues to increase. Indeed, estimates are that by the mids, the United States will be majority minority.

Until we are confronted by a different way of doing things, we assume that everyone does things the same way that we do, and thus our own culture-our values, attitudes, behavior-is largely hidden from our view. When we spend time analyzing another culture, however, we begin to see our own more clearly and to understand some of the subtleties that motivate our behavior and our opinions.

To enhance rhis understanding, each chapter in the iv American Ways book is followed by a series of exercises. Some of these exercises are specifically designed to encourage students to think about their own values or patterns of behavior and to compare them with what they are learning about or experiencing in American settings.

We have also included a number of exercises to encourage students to interact with and talk with Americans, In these exercises we have provided a set of carefully structured questions that students can ask Americans. The answers they receive will help students form a composite picture of American beliefs and practices as they relate to education, business, government, sports, recreation, and so on.

Some of the chapter exercises provide students with an opportunity to explore more fully an idea chat has been presented or to discuss ideas with other students. You may wish to assign different exercises to different students or to small groups of students and then ask them to share their fmdings and opinions with the class. If possible, small groups should include students from different countries so that in addition to learning about American culrure and their own, they are also learning about other cultures.

Perhaps this is the real goal of a course about culture: to help us become more sensitive to cultural dlfferences, and more accepting of them. However, there will always be aspects of another culture that we may not like, no matter how much we understand it. The objective of this book is not to persuade others to approve of life in the United States, but rather to help them understand it more fully..

About the Third Edition In revising the content of this book, we concentrated on updating events that have occurred since the second edition was published in The issues surrounding multiculturalism continue to be of great importance as the cultural diversity of the United States continues to increase.

Indeed, estimates are that by the mids, the United States will be majority minority. That is, the majority of Americans will be from minority groups. The traditional group of white Americans of European descent will be in the minority.

Already this is the situation in the largest school systems in the country. It is becoming increasingly more difficult to describe the American culture, and it is uncertain whether the traditional mainstream culture will continue to be the dominant culture in the future. In the third edition of this book, the basic conceptual framework of traditional values remains [he same.

However, it is not clear how future generations will interpret or change them. United Stares-c-Civilization-cProblems, exercises. Readers-United States. Crandall, Jo Ann. Kearny, Edward N. PE] Access our Companion Websites, our online catalog, and our local offices around the world.

Visit usat longman. There are many definitions. Some would define it as the art, literature, and music of a people, their architecture, history, religion, and traditions. Ochers might focus more on the customs and specific behavior of a people. This broad definition includes every aspect of human life and interaction.

However, it would be impossible to cover every facer of American culture in a single book. We have, therefore, taken a values approach to our discussion, focusing on the traditional mainstream values that have attracted people to the United States for more than two hundred yeats. After explaining how these traditional values developed, we will trace how they influence various aspectS of American life. Why a book on American culture? There are many reasons. Those of us who have worked with foreign students in American universities or who have taught English to students both here and overseas repeatedly encounter questions about life in the United States.

These students are frequently confused or even mystified about American values, attitudes, and cultural patterns. Even those students who have mastered enough English to take courses in an American university often find that they do not understand the cultural rules well enough to be successful as students.

Many of these rules can be understood only within the broader context of American cultural patterns. It is not only students who need the kind of information presented in this book. Foreign businesspeople, visiting scholars or government officials, and even tourists find their time in the United States more satisfying when they understand the values that underlie American behavior patterns and institutions. Newly arrived immigrants and refugees adapt more easily to their new home when given a systematic introduction to their new country and its inhabitants.

For all of these reasons, American Ways is suitable for a wide audience. It has been used as a text in a number of programs for foreign students, including intensive English programs, short summer courses in the United States for foreign high school and college students, both quarter and semester courses at American universities, government programs for foreign visitors, and classes for immigrants.

It has also been used in many different settings outside the United States, both as a text for students and as a reference guide-s-for U. Peace Corps volunteers, for example, and. What do we really learn when we study other cultures? First and foremost, we learn about our own. Until we are confronted by a different way of doing things, we assume that everyone does things the same way that we do, and thus our own culture-our values, attitudes, behavior-is largely hidden from our view.

When we spend time analyzing another culture, however, we begin to see our own more clearly and to understand some of the subtleties that motivate our behavior and our opinions. To enhance rhis understanding, each chapter in the. Some of these exercises are specifically designed to encourage students to think about their own values or patterns of behavior and to compare them with what they are learning about or experiencing in American settings.

We have also included a number of exercises to encourage students to interact with and talk with Americans, In these exercises we have provided a set of carefully structured questions that students can ask Americans.

The answers they receive will help students form a composite picture of American beliefs and practices as they relate to education, business, government, sports, recreation, and so on. Some of the chapter exercises provide students with an opportunity to explore more fully an idea chat has been presented or to discuss ideas with other students.

You may wish to assign different exercises to different students or to small groups of students and then ask them to share their fmdings and opinions with the class.

If possible, small groups should include students from different countries so that in addition to learning about American culrure and their own, they are also learning about other cultures.

Perhaps this is the real goal of a course about culture: However, there will always be aspects of another culture that we may not like, no matter how much we understand it. The objective of this book is not to persuade others to approve of life in the United States, but rather to help them understand it more fully.. About the Third Edition In revising the content of this book, we concentrated on updating events that have occurred since the second edition was published in The issues surrounding multiculturalism continue to be of great importance as the cultural diversity of the United States continues to increase.

Indeed, estimates are that by the mids, the United States will be majority minority. That is, the majority of Americans will be from minority groups. The traditional group of white Americans of European descent will be in the minority. Already this is the situation in the largest school systems in the country.

It is becoming increasingly more difficult to describe the American culture, and it is uncertain whether the traditional mainstream culture will continue to be the dominant culture in the future. In the third edition of this book, the basic conceptual framework of traditional values remains [he same.

The Case for Reparations

However, it is not clear how future generations will interpret or change them. Chapter 12 has been completely rewritten to focus more dearly on what is happening to traditional American values and on the challenges the United States faces after the terrorist attacks of September 11, Originally we envisioned this book primarily for use in English language courses designed to prepare students to study in American universities. We believe students in those courses need experience presenting information and voicing their personal opinions to others: We have written many exercises that suggest appropriate topics and activities.

The third edition also includes other exercises that can be used to help students become more effective in American universities. For example, some exercises provide instruction on how to identify and organize academic information inca main ideas and supporting details; others focus on skimming and scanning.

There is also much more attention to vocabulary in this edition, including To the Teacher v. Answers to the exercises, additional teaching tips, and graphic organizers can be found in the Teacher's Manual, We have been delighted to hear from many teachers about creative ways they have used American 1.

Teachers have used the values framework to design courses where students could explore ways in which the values appear in American literature or current events, for example, focusing on materials the teacher developed from other sources and presented in addition to the text.

Level High intermediate to advanced. The vocabulary level is in the range of 3, to 4, words, with emphasis on the Academic Word List. Grammatical structures are not controlled, although an effort has been made to avoid overly complex patterns. Content Information about traditional basic American values, where they came from, and how these values affect various institutions and aspects of life in the United States, for example, religion, business, government, race relations, education, recreation, and the family.

Types of Exercises Pre-reading activities, vocabulary work including collocation exercises , comprehension questions on barb main ideas and details, topics for discussion, values clarification, questions for Americans, suggestions for research and oral reports, ideas for pair work and group projects, proverbs, people watching and experiments, understanding polls and the media, Internet activities, writing topics, and suggested books and movies.

In Kentucky, she established and administered a private language school and directed programs for refugees.. Edward N. Kearny is professor emeritus of government at Western Kentucky University. He earned his Ph. He also holds a bachelor's degree in economics and a master's degree in psychology, and he has written a number ofbooks and articles on American politics. Acknowledgments Our great appreciation goes to Elizabeth Coppolino for helping us with the permissions, and to Lisa Kearny for contributing creative ideas for exercises and activities that would be fun.

We also want to thank all the editors at Pearson for their considerable efforts and contributions: We wish to acknowledge the comments and encouragement we have received from many colleagues who have used this book in a wide range of settings all over the world. We would also like to thank the students we have worked with over the years for sharing their insights and perceptions of the United States with us and, in the process, helping us ro better understand our own American culture.

Culture hides much more than it reveals, and strangely enough what it hides, it hides most effectively from its own participants. Years of study have convinced me that the realjob is not to understand foreign culture but to understand our own. Edward T. Hall If a country has great ethnic diversity, would you expect to find many people who speak different languages and have different customs?

Could planning a visit to another COUntry. Some of these words are key to understanding the chapter reading. If there are more people in the United States who speak English than Spanish, which is the dominant language in the United States? Is the climate of a country a significant factor in the daily lives of the people?

Hall at the beginning of the chapter. Read the quotation and find the words with the following meanings. Write each word next to its meaning. Before you read the chapter, think about what you know about the "culture" of a country. Work with a partner and answer the questions.

If someone asked you to describe your country's culture, which of these would you mention? Do you agree with the quotation by Edward T. Do people really not understand their own culture? What aspects of a country's culture are the hardest to understand? Look at the pictures, charts, and graphs in this chapter, and read the headings.

Then predict three topics you think this chapter will discuss. If we visit another country, we can observe the people and how they live, and we can answer some of these questions. But the most interesting questions are often the hardest to answer: In trying to answer these questions about Americans, we must remember twO things: It is difficult to comprehend the size of the country until you have tried to travel from one city to another.

If you got in a car in New York and drove to Los Angeles, stopping only to get gas, eat, and sleep, it would take you four or five days. It takes twO full days to drive from New York to Florida. On a typical winter day, it might be raining in Washington, D. It is not difficult to imagine how different daily life might be in. The other significant factor influencing American lifeethnic diversity-is probably even more important.

In the s, Spain established serrlernenrs in Florida, California, and the Southwest, and France claimed large territories in the center Qf the North American continent.

Bur from the to the birrh of the United Scares in , most immigrants were from northern , incidentally.: Europe, and the majority were from England. It was these people who shaped the values and traditions that became the dominant, traditional culture of the United States. Over the next years, the country took in about 35 million immigrants, with the greatest numbers coming in the late s and the early s.

Many of these new immigrants were nor from northern Europe. In , 40, Chinese arrived, and between and there were more than 30, Japanese immigrants. But by far the largest numbers of the new immigrants were from central, eastern, and southern Europe. The new immigrants brought different languages and different cultures to the United States, but gradually most of them assimilated- to the dominant American culture they found here.

In , a year when a million new immigrants arrived in the United States, Israel ZangwiU wrote in a play,. America is God's Crucible,3 the great Melting-Pot where all the races of Europe are melting and reforming. Since Zangwill first used the term melting pot to describe the United States, the concept has been debated.

In Chapter 8 we consider this issue in more detail, and trace the history of African Americans as well. Two things are certain-the dominant American culture has survived, and it has more or less successfully absorbed vast numbers of immigrants at various points in its history.

It has also been changed over time by all the immigram groups who have serried here. If we look at the immigration patterns of the s, we see that the greatest numbers came at the beginning and at the end of the century. In , however, the country began to limit immigration, and the Immigration Act of virtually dosed the door. The total number of ' immigrants admitted per year dropped from as many as a million to only , A quota system was established that specified the number of im m igrams rh at could come from each country.

It heavily favored immigrants from northern and western Europe and severely limited everyone else.

This system remained in effect until , with several exceptions allowing groups of refugees from countries such as Hungary, Cuba, Vietnam, and Cambodia into the United States. The immigration laws began to change in and the yearly totals began to rise again, from about , per year in the s to over a million per year in the s.

American Ways, Third Edition: A Cultural Guide to the United States of America

By the end of the century, the United States was admitting more immigrants than all the other industrialized countries combined. Changes in the laws that were intended to help family reunifications 4 resulted in large numbers of non-Europeans, creating another group of new immigrants.

By the late , 90 percent of all immigrants were coming from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia. By [he year , more than 11 percent of all Americans were foreign born, born in anomer country.

Some states had even higher percentages of foreign-born residents: The regional cateqories shown above encompass many ethnlclties.

The rwenry-firsc-cenrury immigration patterns are continuing ro change [he color and [he ethnic mix of the American population.. First, the percentage of white Americans of European descentf is growing smaller. Few Europeans are immigrating to he United States now, and many of those who came in the early s have died.

Their descendants have married Americans with ancestors from other countries, and many of these second- and third-generation immigrants no longer think of themselves as Irish or German or English.

Hispanics now represent the L. Recognizing the Data U. As the minority, nonwhite population of the United States conrinues to grow, the white rnajoriry grows smaller. To what degree will they choose to take on the traditional American values and culture? How much will they try to maintain their own language and cultural traditions?

Will chey create an entirely new culture based on some combination of their values and those of the traditional American culture? Thus, many grandchildren of immigrants do not speak the language of the old country and are simply American by culture. However, in parts of the country with established communities that share a common language or culture, bilingualism'[ and biculturalism continue. This is particularly true in communities where new immigrants are still arriving.

In California, for example, the test for a driver's license is given in thirty different languages. In general, cultural pluralisrn'' is more accepted in the United States today than it was in the first half of the twentieth century, and many of the school systems have developed bilingual programs and multicultural curricula.

The census of recognized the increase in the diversity of the American population. There were many racial and ethnic categories to choose from, and for the first time it was possible to select more than one category.

For further information, visit Ihe government website www.

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On the one hand, many Americans try to maintain their ethnic heritage and their cultural traditions. On the other hand, the number of interracial marriages is increasing, and the majority of young people believe it does not matter which race they marry. Some have called this the "Tiger Woods effect," referring to the U. By the middle of the century, the nation will probably no longer have a white majority; some say the color of most Americans will be more like beige, or light brown, as a result of [he mixing of races and ethnic groups.

Already, many of the nation's largest cines are "majority minority. In the United States, 18 people have become very sensitive to the language used to describe racial and ethnic groups, and they try to be politically correct, or "P. North American continent. Some Spanish speakers prefer to be called Latinos referring to Latin America instead of Hispanics referring to Spain , while others prefer to be identified by their country of origin Cuban-American or Cuban, Chicano, Mexican-American or Mexican, etc.

Since the census uses a variety of terms, we will also use the terms white, Native American or American Indian, black or African-American, and Hispanic or Latino. That tie is a sense of national identiry-of being an American. Incidentally, when citizens of the United States refer to themselves as Americans, they have no intention of excluding people from Canada or Latin American countries as residents of the American continents.

There is no term such as United Statesians in me English language, so people call themselves Americans. Thus, what is really a language problem has sometimes caused misunderstandings. Although citizens of Latin American countries may call the people in the United States North Americans, ro many people in the United States this makes no sense either, because the term North American refers to Canadians and Mexicans as well as citizens of the United Stares..

The word American, men, is used in this [ext as the nationality of the people who live in the United Stares of America.

What holds them together and makes them feel American? Is it possible to make generalizations about what they believe? As we [a. The ways in which some Americans practice their beliefs may also differ, resulting in a great variety of lifestyles.

What we attempt to do is to define and explain the traditional, dominant cultural values that have for so many years attracted immigrants to the United Stares. Tocqueville came to the United Srates as a yo ung Frenchman in to srudy the American form of democracy and what it might mean to the rest of the world. After a visit of only nine months he wrote a.. Tocqueville had unusual powers of observation.

He described not only the democratic system of government and how it operated, but also its effect on how Americans think, feel, and act.

Many scholars believe that he had a deeper understanding of traditional American beliefs and values than anyone else who has written about the United States. What is so remarkable is that many of these traits of the American character, which he observed nearly years ago, are still visible and meaningful today. He came in the s, before America was industrialized.

This was the era of the small farmer, the small businessman, and the seeding of the western frontier. It was the period of history when the traditional values of the new country were being established. In just a generation, some forty years since the adoption ot the U. Constitution, the new form of government had already produced a society of people with unique values.

The character traits Tocqueville describes are the same-ones that many Americans still take pride in today. He, however, was a neutral observer and saw both the good and the bad sides of these qualities.

It is not a book of cold facts about American behavior or institutions, 10 but rather it is about the motivating forces behind the people and their institutions. It is about how these traditional basic beliefs and values affect important aspects of American life: We invite you to participate in this book. We will describe what many Americans think and believe, but you will have an opportunity [0 test these descriptions by making your own observations.

As you read about these traditional basic values, think of themas worki ng hypotheses 11 which you can test on Americans, on people of other nations, and on people of your nationality. Compare them with your own values and beliefs and with what is most important in your life. Through this process, you should emerge with a better understanding not only of Americans, bur also of your own culture and yourself.

It is by studying ochers that we learn about ourselves. Understand Main Ideas Academic English organizes information into main or most important ideas and supporting details. That is, there are usually three or four major points presented, and the rest of the information serves to explain or support these main ideas: The introduction focuses your attention on the topic. Then the main points are presented, and the conclusion reminds you of one or more central ideas.

Noticing the headings in a text will help you figure out the main points the writer is presenting. Check the predictions that you made on page 2 before reading the chapter. Then answer these questions about the main ideas. L What are two important factors that affect life in the United States?

What is the heading for the section chat discusses the history of immigration. American BeLiefs? Understand Details Write T if the statement is true and F if it is false according to the information the chapter. One factor affecting lifestyles in the United States is the differenr climates. American Indians all speak the same language. The dominant American culture was established by immigrants who came from southern Europe. Throughout the history of the United Stares, more immigrants have come from English-speaking countries than any other countries.

ZangwiIl believed that immigrants would lose their native cultures and become something; different when they came to the United States. All immigrants want to assimilate to the U. The English language has no adjective for United States and therefore uses the term American to refer to its people.

It is not possible to make generalizations about what Americans believe because they are so different. Many of the characteristics of Americans which Alexi de Tocqueville observed in the are still true today. Improve Your Reading Skills:. Scanning In order to become a good reader in English, your reading speed and techniques should vary according to your purpose.

This eype of reading for a specific fact is called scanning. Read the questions below. Scan the reading to find the specific information need to answer each question. Talk About It Work in small group. What are some of the challenges that size large or small and diversity great or limited present to a country? Should a country have immigration quotas based on country of origin?

Should immigrants become citizens? Should countries allow "guest workers" people who work there temporarily? How would you describe the average person in your country and what he or she believes? Do you think people all over the world are basically the same or basically very different? Build Your Vocabulary Use Context. Clues There are several types of context dues that will help you guess the meaning of words you do not know. By looking at the words around an unfamiliar word, you may be able to figure out its meaning.

See the fOLIT kinds of context dues on the next page. In the examples, the vocabulary words are in boldface. The context clues are in italics. The word may be defined in the sentence. Sometimes the definition is set off by commas or dashes.

Other times it is not. There is still a tie that binds Americans together. That tie is. There may be a synonym used in the same sentence. Native Americans belong to. There may be a comparison or contrast with a word or a phrase more familiar to you. As the minority, nonwhite population. The sentence may give an example that helps you figure out the meaning. Tocqueville, however, was a neutral observer and. Use the context dues to figure out the meaning of the boldfaced words in the sentences above.

Then write the correct word next to its definition. Now fill in the blanks with some of the boldfaced words above to complete the paragraph. What qualities give people a national have characteristics that are The people who are part of a 2. First match the AWL words with their definitions. Then find the AWL words in the puzzle and circle them. Words may run horizontally. Understand Prefixes Recognizing the meaning of a prefix, a group of letters added to the beginning of a word or its root , will also help you guess the meaning of a new word.

For example, the prefix re- means again reunification and the prefix mismeans wrong misunderstand. Each of the boldfaced words in the sentences below has a prefix. Identify the prefix and write its meaning.. Use a dictionary. Before the , the majority of immigrants to the United States were Europeans, but changes in immigration laws resulted in large numbers of non-Ewopeans.

Estimates were that in addition to legal immigration, illegal immigration was add. In some parts of the country with established communities that share a common language or culture, bilingualism and biculturalism continue.

Cultural pluralism is more accepted now than in the first half of the twentieth century, and many of the school systems have developed bilingual programs and multicultural curricula. People may migrate to another location in order to find work. While many people immigrate co the United States each year, very few Americans choose to emigrate to another country to live. In the census of , there were nineteen racial categories to choose from. The number ofinterracial marriages is increasing Word Partners Certain words and phrases tend to go together in English, for example, ethnic diversity or traditional values.

This is called collocation. Learning these word panners will increase your ability to use new words correctly and help you express yourself as native speakers do. Read the sentences below. Then match the adjectives on the left with their noun partners o,n the right.

Immigrants b.

Tocqueville was a and. Ethnic diversity is a 4. The United States now takes in more each year than all other combined. If there are no Americans to interview. Americans are students or your classmates. They don't really like 4. Theyact 5. Most Americans believe in 6.

The United States' is a country where 7. The average American is 8. Americans today are worried about 9. The most important thing in life CO.

Think, Pair, Share Think about the following questions. Then discuss your answers with a partner and share your answers with another pair of students. How would you define culeure: Look at several dictionaries to find definitions and read the first paragraph of the introduction to this book. Complete the statements in the previous exercise Ask Americans about your own country and share your answers. For example: Understand Polls Conducting opinion polls is very popular in the United States. A newspaper, a magazine, a TV station, or a professional polling organization asks a representative group of Americans several questions to determine what their opinions are about a given topic.

The pollsters choose men and women of different ages, occupations, and races in the same proportion that these groups are found in the population. Sometimes, however, a random sample is taken which picks people by chance. Polls are especially popular around election time because everyone wants to know which candidate is ahead in the race and what the voters think about the key issues of the campaign.

There are three well-known polling organizations chat measure public opinion on a variety of topics: SUVs are extremely popular with Americans, even though they are more expensive to drive because they generally do not get good gas mileage, Polls show that one reason for their popularity is that owners of SUVs feel that they and their families are safer in these large vehicles than they would be in other cars.

However, studies have shown that SUVs may roll over more easily and may therefore be more dangerous than people originaUy thought. The Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety organization asked the Harris polling organization to survey attitudes about the safety of SUVs and other vehicles.

One of the questions was "The next time you download a new vehicle, would you like to see information posted on a window sticker about the likelihood of a rollover, or would you not like ro see that information on a window sticker? Van Source: Survey of the Attitude' louis H'orri! According to this poll, do you think people who own SUVs are much more concerned about rollovers than those who own other vehicles?

Are Americans who live in the West more or less interested in rollover stickers than people who live in the South? Which socioeconomic group appears the least concerned-those the least money, or those who make the most? Many Americans who own SUVs have a lifestyle that is child-centered. In his book, The Clustered World: Wejss describes sixty-two distinct American lifestyles, or dusters of behavior. It's not uncommen fol' parents to put in fifty miles a day carpooling their.

Forleisure, these Americans are more likely than the general population to throw barbecues, watch videos, and play board games,.. People Watching Different countries have different rules for personal space, that is, when people touch, how close they stand when they are speaking to one another, how close they sit, how they behave on elevators, etc.

The rules for personal space sometimes differ according to how well people know each other. They are usually not consciously aware of these rules, bur they may become very uncomfortable if the rules are broken and their space is entered without permission.

You can discover rhe rules by observing people interacting and also by testing or breaking rhe rules to see how other people respond. Conduct two experiments about personal space. Follow these steps. Read the rules for personal space below.

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Make your own observations of people. Write your observations in a journal. It may be helpful to work in pairs: One person tests the rules while the other observes and records what happens. Experiment with the rules. Write rhe responses you receive.

First Rule: When they are in a crowd, Americans have a bubble of space around their bodies which is about an inch thick. This bubble of space must not be broken by a stranger. If American strangers touch each other accidenrally, they mutter an apology such as "Pardon me," "Excuse me," "Oh, I'm sorry. Watch people in a crowd, standing in line, waiting in a group, or passing on a street or in a hallway. Who is touching whom?

What does their relationship appear [Q be? What happens when people touch accidentally? How does the person touched respond? Whar does [he one who has broken the other's bubble do? Record gestures. See how close you can stand to someone in a crowd without touching him or her.

Try breaking someone's bubble of space with a very light touch of your elbow or arm. What is the person's response?

This may provoke an angry responsel. Second Rule: When standing in elevators, Americans usually face the door, speak quietly, and try to avoid touching one another. If a stranger enters an elevator where there is only one other person, he or she will stand on the opposite side of the elevator.What does the other person do?

Today it is 36, He was drafted into the Army. For the vast majority of the immigrants who came here, this was probably the most compelling reason for leaving their homeland. You can participate in their weekly poll. Then the main points are presented, and the conclusion reminds you of one or more central ideas.

All immigrants want to assimilate to the U.

LOVETTA from Norwalk
I do love reading novels carelessly . See my other articles. I have a variety of hobbies, like bowlliards.
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